Suggested Viewing

These TED Talks and longer videos can help you burst your own bubble and try on different perspectives:

 

The Danger of a Single Story by Chimamanda Adichie

 

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice — and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.

 

The Lie That Invented Racism by John Biewen

 

To understand and eradicate racist thinking, start at the beginning. That’s what journalist and documentarian John Biewen did, leading to a trove of surprising and thought-provoking information on the “origins” of race. He shares his findings, supplying answers to fundamental questions about racism — and lays out an exemplary path for practicing effective allyship.

 

The Story We Tell About Poverty Isn’t True by Mia Birdsong

 

As a global community, we all want to end poverty. Mia Birdsong suggests a great place to start: Let’s honor the skills, drive and initiative that poor people bring to the struggle every day. She asks us to look again at people in poverty: They may be broke — but they’re not broken.

 

Crash Course: Black American History

 

Clint Smith teaches you Black American History in 50 episodes.

 

A Prosecutor’s Vision for a Better Justice System by Adam Foss

 

When a kid commits a crime, the US justice system has a choice: prosecute to the full extent of the law, or take a step back and ask if saddling young people with criminal records is the right thing to do every time. In this searching talk, Adam Foss, a prosecutor with the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office in Boston, makes his case for a reformed justice system that replaces wrath with opportunity, changing people’s lives for the better instead of ruining them.

 

 A Letter to All Who Have Lost in This Era by Anand Giridharadas

 

Summer, 2016: amid populist revolts, clashing resentments and fear, writer Anand Giridharadas doesn’t give a talk but reads a letter. It’s from those who have won in this era of change, to those who have, or feel, lost. It confesses to ignoring pain until it became anger. It chides an idealistic yet remote elite for its behind-closed-doors world-saving and airy, self-serving futurism — for at times worrying more about sending people to Mars than helping them on Earth. And it rejects the exclusionary dogmas to which we cling, calling us instead to “dare to commit to the dream of each other.”

 

 The Difference Between Being “Not Racist” and Antiracist by Ibram X. Kendi

 

There is no such thing as being “not racist,” says author and historian Ibram X. Kendi. In this vital conversation, he defines the transformative concept of antiracism to help us more clearly recognize, take responsibility for and reject prejudices in our public policies, workplaces and personal beliefs. Learn how you can actively use this awareness to uproot injustice and inequality in the world — and replace it with love.

 

 So You Want to Talk About Race by Ijeoma Oluo

 

Ijeoma Oluo is one of the most influential people in Seattle, according to Seattle Magazine. She’s also the Editor-At-Large at The Establishment – a media platform run and funded by women. In her new book “So you want to talk about race”, she demonstrates that her remarkable writing abilities by bringing clarity and insight to hyper-charged issues facing America. She discusses why it’s so hard talk about race and why we must do it anyway.

 

 The Danger of Silence by Clint Smith III

 

“We spend so much time listening to the things people are saying that we rarely pay attention to the things they don’t,” says poet and teacher Clint Smith. A short, powerful piece from the heart, about finding the courage to speak up against ignorance and injustice.

 

How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love Talking About Race by Jay Smooth

 

Jay Smooth is host of New York’s longest running hip-hop radio show, the Underground Railroad on WBAI 99.5 FM in NY, and is an acclaimed commentator on politics and culture. In this talk, he discusses the sometimes thorny territory of how we discuss issues of race and racism, offering insightful and humorous suggestions for expanding our perception of the subject.

 

We Need to Talk About an Injustice by Bryan Stevenson

 

In an engaging and personal talk — with cameo appearances from his grandmother and Rosa Parks — human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America’s justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial lines: a third of the country’s black male population has been incarcerated at some point in their lives. These issues, which are wrapped up in America’s unexamined history, are rarely talked about with this level of candor, insight and persuasiveness.

RACE: The Power of An Illusion video series – available for streaming ($2.99 per episode)

Companion website with additional clips and other resources: https://www.racepowerofanillusion.org/

 

The division of the world’s peoples into distinct groups – “red,” “black,” “white” or “yellow” peoples – has became so deeply imbedded in our psyches, so widely accepted, many would promptly dismiss as crazy any suggestion of its falsity. Yet, that’s exactly what this provocative, new three-hour series by California Newsreel claims. Race – The Power of an Illusion questions the very idea of race as biology, suggesting that a belief in race is no more sound than believing that the sun revolves around the earth.

 

Charlotte Mecklenburg Library – BE: Black Entrepreneurs Series

The BE: Black Entrepreneurs Series features weekly interviews with local Black owned businesses in an effort to create community awareness.

 

Rumble:  The Indians Who Rocked the World

 

“Rumble:  The Indians Who Rocked the World” is an award-winning feature documentary about the role of Native Americans in popular music history.  The film features musical icons such as Charley Patton, Buffy Sainte-Marie, Jimi Hendrix, Redbone, and more.

 

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